February 2009

 

Start With the Most Difficult Part

There’s not a lot you can change in the process of constructing a building. You must lay the foundation before you erect the upper floors, and you can’t paint without having the walls in place. In software, we’re blessed with more freedom.

Continue reading "Start With the Most Difficult Part"

The Information Train

Experiment overview The Information Train is a scientific experiment that I presented at the Wizards of Science 2009 contest over the past weekend. The entry demonstrates how computers communicate with each other by setting up a network in which a model train transfers a picture's pixels from one computer to the other. You can find a video of the experiment on YouTube, and, if you're interested, you can also download the corresponding software and schematics from this web page.

Continue reading "The Information Train"

Visualizing Revision Logs with a UML Sequence Diagram

How can you visualize the developers' contributions in a collaborative project? One way involves drawing timelines adorned with marks indicating each developer's contribution. This is a simple UML sequence diagram, a diagram that allows you to see the interactions of objects, but in this case the objects are the actual developers and the interactions are their contributions.

Continue reading "Visualizing Revision Logs with a UML Sequence Diagram"

Beautiful Architecture

What are the ingredients of robust, elegant, flexible, and maintainable software architecture? Over the past couple of years, my colleague Georgios Gousios and I worked on answering this question through a collection of intriguing essays from more than a dozen of today's leading software designers and architects.

Continue reading "Beautiful Architecture"

The World's Smallest Domain-Specific Language

Domain-specific languages, also known as little languages, allow us to express knowledge in a form close to the problem at hand. In contrast to general-purpose languages, like Java or C++, they are specialized for a narrow domain. Earlier today I wanted to initialize a rectangular array of Boolean values to represent the stick figure of a human. For that I devised a tiny domain-specific language (DSL) consisting of two symbols (representing an on and an off pixel) and wrote its commensurably simple interpreter.

Continue reading "The World's Smallest Domain-Specific Language"

Become a Unix command line wizard
edX MOOC on Unix Tools: Data, Software, and Production Engineering
Debug like a master
Book cover of Effective Debugging
Compute with style
Book cover of The Elements of Computing Style
Syndication
This blog is also available as an RSS feed: XML RSS feed

Category Tags
AWS (4)
Android (2)
Apple (9)
C (20)
C++ (16)
Cloud (1)
Computers (58)
Databases (4)
Debugging (7)
Design (1)
Discussion (6)
Electronics (14)
Environment (1)
FreeBSD (25)
Funny (14)
GSIS (5)
Google (6)
Government (2)
Hacks (25)
Hardware (23)
History (7)
Internet (12)
Java (26)
Linux (6)
Management (26)
Microsoft (11)
One Laptop Per Child (3)
Open source (57)
Opinion (28)
Parenting (11)
Perl (13)
Photos (13)
Politics (4)
Programming (108)
R (1)
Raspberry Pi (3)
Risks (6)
Scala (1)
Science (33)
Security (26)
Sights (19)
Smartphones (3)
Software (21)
Software engineering (88)
Standards (6)
System administration (46)
Teaching (8)
Technology (27)
Testing (1)
Tips (41)
Tools of the Trade (52)
Travel (9)
UML (6)
Unix (44)
Web (31)
Windows (14)
Writing (45)
XML (10)
vim (5)
Archive
Complete contents (355)
February 2020 (1)
December 2019 (2)
November 2019 (1)
May 2019 (1)
November 2018 (2)
August 2018 (1)
April 2018 (1)
February 2018 (1)
November 2017 (2)
October 2017 (1)
September 2017 (3)
August 2017 (2)
June 2017 (2)
May 2017 (2)
April 2017 (1)
March 2017 (1)
February 2017 (2)
January 2017 (4)
December 2016 (1)
November 2016 (1)
October 2016 (2)
September 2016 (1)
May 2016 (1)
March 2016 (1)
December 2015 (1)
November 2015 (1)
June 2015 (1)
May 2015 (1)
February 2015 (1)
January 2015 (1)
September 2014 (1)
August 2014 (1)
July 2014 (1)
April 2014 (1)
January 2014 (1)
December 2013 (2)
October 2013 (1)
September 2013 (1)
July 2013 (2)
June 2013 (2)
May 2013 (1)
March 2013 (2)
February 2013 (1)
January 2013 (1)
December 2012 (3)
October 2012 (2)
September 2012 (3)
August 2012 (1)
July 2012 (1)
June 2012 (1)
May 2012 (1)
March 2012 (2)
February 2012 (1)
January 2012 (2)
December 2011 (3)
November 2011 (1)
October 2011 (1)
September 2011 (1)
July 2011 (3)
May 2011 (3)
February 2011 (1)
January 2011 (1)
November 2010 (1)
October 2010 (2)
August 2010 (3)
July 2010 (1)
June 2010 (1)
May 2010 (1)
April 2010 (1)
March 2010 (2)
January 2010 (1)
December 2009 (1)
November 2009 (1)
October 2009 (2)
September 2009 (2)
August 2009 (5)
July 2009 (3)
June 2009 (3)
May 2009 (4)
April 2009 (6)
March 2009 (4)
February 2009 (5)
January 2009 (4)
December 2008 (3)
November 2008 (2)
October 2008 (5)
September 2008 (4)
August 2008 (4)
July 2008 (3)
June 2008 (2)
May 2008 (5)
April 2008 (3)
March 2008 (2)
February 2008 (2)
January 2008 (5)
December 2007 (3)
November 2007 (3)
October 2007 (3)
September 2007 (4)
August 2007 (2)
July 2007 (2)
June 2007 (4)
May 2007 (3)
April 2007 (5)
March 2007 (5)
February 2007 (3)
January 2007 (4)
December 2006 (5)
November 2006 (5)
October 2006 (5)
September 2006 (7)
August 2006 (1)
July 2006 (5)
June 2006 (3)
May 2006 (3)
April 2006 (4)
March 2006 (2)
February 2006 (3)
January 2006 (5)
December 2005 (3)
November 2005 (4)
October 2005 (3)
September 2005 (6)
August 2005 (1)
July 2005 (4)
June 2005 (2)
May 2005 (6)
April 2005 (3)
March 2005 (4)
February 2005 (6)
January 2005 (2)
December 2004 (3)
November 2004 (3)
October 2004 (5)
September 2004 (3)
August 2004 (5)
July 2004 (1)
June 2004 (1)
May 2004 (1)
April 2004 (2)
March 2004 (1)
February 2004 (2)
January 2004 (3)
October 2003 (2)
September 2003 (1)
July 2003 (1)
June 2003 (2)
May 2003 (1)

Last update: Wednesday, February 26, 2020 11:41 am

Creative Commons Licence

Unless otherwise expressly stated, all original material on this page created by Diomidis Spinellis is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.